Recovery Resources

  • Peer Support Groups
  • Diagnosing Substance Use Disorder
  • Addictions Research
  • Advocacy and Policy Resources

Bay Area Treatment Resources:

MPI at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland
Bayside Marin
For adolescents: Thunder Road Youth Services

Finding Quality Addiction Treatment

Peer Support Groups

  • East Bay Alcoholics Anonymous https://eastbayaa.org/ 
    Alanon For people with family member (friend, partner, etc) with a drinking or drug problem. Good for codependency. (I recommend anyone who is in a “care” profession to try Alanon or CODA) https://district26.ncwsa.org
  • Narcotics Anonymous http://www.naalamedacounty.org/
  • CODA http://www.sfbaycoda.net/
  • Gamblers Anonymous http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/locations
  • Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous https://www.slaa-sfeb.org/
    • If you struggle with sex and love addition or another behavioral addiction (like gambling, eating disorders, video games, or workaholism), I recommend The Meadows in AZ.  (it is a little pricey, though).
  • COSA (for partners of SLAA members) https://www.cosa-recovery.org/home.html
  • Refuge Recovery is a mindfulness-based addiction recovery community that practices and utilizes Buddhist philosophy as the foundation of the recovery process. Drawing inspiration from the core teachings of the Four Noble Truths, emphasis is placed on both knowledge and empathy as a means for overcoming addiction and its causes. Those struggling with any form of addiction greatly benefit when they are able to understand the suffering that addiction has created while developing compassion for the pain they have experienced. http://refugerecovery.org/meetings
  • LifeRing Secular Recovery is an abstinence-based, worldwide network of individuals seeking to live in recovery from addiction to alcohol or to other non-medically indicated drugs. In LifeRing, we offer each other peer-to-peer support in ways that encourage personal growth and continued learning through personal empowerment. http://liferingsf.org/
  • Women for Sobriety is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women discover an abstinent New Life. It is the first self-help recovery program based on the unique emotional needs of women. WFS was founded in July, 1975, and has been helping women in recovery from alcohol and drug addictions for over 40 years. http://womenforsobriety.org/

Do I Have a Problem? (Formal Diagnosis: Substance Use Disorder)

In 2013, American Psychiatric Association updated The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5), replacing the categories of substance abuse and substance dependence with a single category: substance use disorder. The symptoms associated with a substance use disorder fall into four major groupings: impaired control, social impairment, risky use, and pharmacological criteria (i.e., tolerance and withdrawal).
The new DSM describes a problematic pattern of use of an intoxicating substance leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by at least two of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

  1. The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
  2. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful effort to cut down or control use of the substance.
  3. A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance, use the substance, or recover from its effects.
  4. Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use the substance.
  5. Recurrent use of the substance resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
  6. Continued use of the substance despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of its use.
  7. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of use of the substance.
  8. Recurrent use of the substance in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
  9. Use of the substance is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by the substance.
  10. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:
    1. A need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
    2. A markedly diminished effect with continued use of the sameamount of the substance.
  11. Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following:
    1. The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for that substance (as specified in the DSM5 for each substance).
    2. The substance (or a closely related substance) is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Research

The Science of Drug Abuse and Addiction: The Basics

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/media-guide/science-drug-abuse-addiction-basics

*Great brief resource outlining current DSM-V definition of addiction, basic facts about substances, places to get more information.

Behavioral Addictions:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164585/

*Interesting research review that discusses the nature of behavioral/process addictions

Growing evidence suggests that behavioral addictions resemble substance addictions in many domains, including natural history, phenomenology, tolerance, comorbidity, overlapping genetic contribution, neurobiological mechanisms, and response to treatment, supporting the DSM-V Task Force proposed new category of Addiction and Related Disorders encompassing both substance use disorders and non-substance addictions. Current data suggest that this combined category may be appropriate for pathological gambling and a few other better studied behavioral addictions, e.g., Internet addiction. There is currently insufficient data to justify any classification of other proposed behavioral addictions.

Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide (Third Edition)

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/preface

This update of the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment is intended to address addiction to a wide variety of drugs, including nicotine, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs. It is designed to serve as a resource for healthcare providers, family members, and other stakeholders trying to address the myriad problems faced by patients in need of treatment for drug abuse or addiction

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Resource Center

https://www.samhsa.gov/ebp-resource-center

SAMHSA announces the launch of the Evidence-Based Practices Resource Center, which aims to provide communities, clinicians, policymakers, and others in the field with the information and tools they need to incorporate evidence-based practices into their communities or clinical settings. The Resource Center contains a collection of science-based resources for a broad range of audiences, including Treatment Improvement Protocols, toolkits, resource guides, and clinical practice guidelines. Recognizing the enormity of the opioid epidemic, the Resource Center includes an opioid-specific resources section.

 Advocacy and Policy Resources: 

ENDING THE OPIOID CRISIS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR STATE POLICYMAKERS (2017)

https://www.centeronaddiction.org/addiction-research/reports/ending-opioid-crisis-practical-guide-state-policymakers

*Great resource for advocacy work, preaching, and teaching in communities

This guide shows state policymakers how to implement a public health approach to end the opioid epidemic. By offering concrete strategies, this concise resource provides the tools needed to prevent, reduce, treat and manage opioid misuse, addiction and the associated consequences. The guide’s recommendations draw from our research, as well as that of other organizations committed to eradicating addiction. We also include examples of data-informed, treatment-focused initiatives on the state and local levels that can serve as models for others struggling to contain this epidemic.

UNCOVERING COVERAGE GAPS: A REVIEW OF ADDICTION BENEFITS IN ACA PLANS (2017)

https://www.centeronaddiction.org/addiction-research/reports/uncovering-coverage-gaps-review-of-addiction-benefits-in-aca-plans

This comprehensive review of the addiction benefits offered in the 2017 Essential Health Benefits (EHB) benchmark plans found that none of the plans provide adequate addiction benefits, and over two-thirds violate the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA holds great promise for expanding access to addiction treatment. The law mandates coverage of substance use disorder services, and requires that these benefits be provided at parity, meaning they must be equal or comparable to medical/surgical benefits. The ACA does not identify which benefits should be covered; instead, each state chooses an EHB benchmark plan to determine which addiction benefits must be covered by the ACA plans sold in that state.

ADDICTION MEDICINE: CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN SCIENCE AND PRACTICE (2012)

https://www.centeronaddiction.org/addiction-research/reports/addiction-medicine-closing-gap-between-science-and-practice

This 5-year study found that, despite the prevalence of addiction, the enormity of its consequences, the availability of effective solutions and the evidence that addiction is a disease, both screening and early intervention for risky substance use are rare, and only about 1 in 10 people with addiction involving alcohol or drugs other than nicotine receive any form of treatment. Of those who do receive treatment, few receive anything that approximates evidence-based care.

Face & Voices of Recovery

https://facesandvoicesofrecovery.org/welcome.html